Constitution 3.0: The Technological and Political Challenges Facing the U.S. Supreme Court.

IIEA3rd July 20171min
In his keynote address, Prof. Rosen argued that in light of dizzying changes in technology, the future of global free speech and privacy is being determined not by the U.S. Supreme Court or by international courts but by lawyers at Google, Facebook, and Twitter, who decide what kind of content to leave up or take down. He addressed the question of how the U.S. Supreme Court will respond to technological change in the age of Google.  He also reflected on how the Court will maintain checks and balances and the rule of law in the face of new populist forces in the U.S. and around the globe.

Podcast: Download the keynote audio podcast from this event here.

About the Speech:

In his keynote address, Prof. Rosen argued that in light of dizzying changes in technology, the future of global free speech and privacy is being determined not by the U.S. Supreme Court or by international courts but by lawyers at Google, Facebook, and Twitter, who decide what kind of content to leave up or take down. He addressed the question of how the U.S. Supreme Court will respond to technological change in the age of Google.  He also reflected on how the Court will maintain checks and balances and the rule of law in the face of new populist forces in the U.S. and around the globe.

About the Speaker:

Professor Rosen is the President and CEO of the National Constitution Centre and a Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School. He is also a Contributing Editor at The Atlantic and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is a graduate of Harvard College; the University of Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar; and Yale Law School. Following law school, he clerked for Chief Judge Abner Mikva at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Image National Constitution Center