Transatlantic Relations: Converging or Diverging?

IIEA12th April 20181min

In light of significant political uncertainty on both sides of the Atlantic, Dr Parakilas set out recommendations, which address the key structural factors that threaten the durability of transatlantic relations. Drawing on insights from a series of scenario workshops and case studies, that were conducted for a recent Chatham House report, he examined the major influencing factors in recent US and European foreign policy decision-making. He analysed whether the relationship between the US and its European allies is at risk of long-term divergence, or if recent areas of apparent policy difference reflect more cyclical trends that can be ridden out.

 

About the Speaker:

Prior to joining Chatham House, Dr Parakilas worked for Action on Armed Violence, a London-based non-governmental organization. His research has largely focused on American foreign policy and international security issues. He holds a BA in International Relations from Hampshire College, an MLitt in Middle East and Central Asian Security Studies from the University of St Andrews, and a PhD in International Relations from the London School of Economics. He has also worked at the World Security Institute, the Arms Control Association and the US Department of Homeland Security.