EU27 Bulletin 27 April – 08 May 2020

Mark Dempsey8th May 20202min
The IIEA’s EU27 Bulletin brings you the key developments from across the EU institutions on a fortnightly basis. Each bulletin follows developments in the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, respectively. We also look ahead to what developments may emerge over the coming weeks.

EU27 Bulletin 27 April – 8 May 2020

The IIEA’s EU27 Bulletin brings you the key developments from across the EU institutions on a fortnightly basis. Each bulletin follows developments in the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, respectively. It also includes a commentary on the response by the EU institutions to COVID-19 and looks ahead to what developments might emerge over the coming weeks.
Each bulletin includes:

  • Analysis of ongoing institutional change;
  • Updates and analysis of institutional legislative proposals;
  • Examination of major policy speeches by EU leaders and senior institution officials; and
  • Updates on key decisions adopted by the EU.

In the midst of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, celebrations were somewhat muted for the 70th anniversary of the Schuman Declaration on 9 May 2020.

This week’s Bulletin covers developments in the European Commission, which offered a grim outlook for the European economy in its Spring Economic Forecast. Commissioner for Trade, Phil Hogan, also offered his perspective on the role of international trade in Europe’s economic recovery.

In the Council, Member States pledged to strengthen engagement with the Western Balkans during a video conference of the much anticipated Western Balkans Summit. Meanwhile, efforts in the Parliament have focused on ensuring the voice of the Parliament is heard in any EU recovery plan.

Finally, the Bulletin explores the significance of a ruling by Germany’s Constitutional Court, which casts doubt over the legality of the ECB’s bond buying programme.

Read this week’s EU27 Bulletin here.

This is part of the Future of the EU27 Project, which is supported by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.